Tag - design history

Chevron: Definition and Design

In their simplest form, chevron patterns are characterized by columns of short diagonal stripes meeting in a line of Vs. In other words, not unlike the skeletons of a fish. Some herringbone prints imitate a woven herringbone, complete with uneven lines that imply the roughness of woolly threads. Others, however, loudly declare their independence of their woven ancestor through various means. For example, some set the diagonals out of kilter, breaking up the V. Meanwhile others make the V wider,...

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Museum L-A is the Newest Design Pool Partner

Design Pool is excited to announce a new partnership with Museum L-A in Lewiston, Maine. Our online library now offers a selection of historical textile designs from the Museum L-A archives. These designs are available to anyone looking to license a design for a product or project. The best news? 100% of the proceeds from the use of these designs will go directly to Museum L-A to fund their cultural and educational exhibits and programs.  Ogee Flower, Pattern P1693Who...

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Textile Design, 8 Fun & Interesting Facts

Everyone at Design Pool may have different roles, but we all have one thing in common. We all have degrees in textile design. When people ask the standard cocktail party question, "What do you do?" answering, "I'm a textile designer" is nearly always a surprise, which kind of blows our minds.We surround ourselves in fabric all day, every day. Above all, fabric protects us, comforts us, and shelters us. However, most people don't consider how it's made or...

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Houndstooth Definition and Design

Like the herringbone, the Houndstooth is a traditionally woven, two-toned textile pattern. Rather than just squares, however, houndstooth is made up of a specific repeating geometric block. The houndstooth pattern is characterized by an almost checked appearance.The term ‘houndstooth’ itself is derived from the protruding jagged teeth that define that particular block. A houndstooth motif is called by the French a pied de poule (chicken’s foot); an extra-large houndstooth is a pied de coq (cock’s foot).  The English used to maintain the birdlike metaphor for houndstooth with the name crow’s...

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