Tag - design history

Animal Skin Prints and Where Our Love Affair Started

Whether chic and elegant or wild and punk rock, animal skin prints are seemingly always on-trend. In fact, it's almost as if our affinity toward them is in our collective DNA. Animal skins and hides were used around the world to clothe people for hundreds of years out of necessity. Some cultures even believed the skin gave the hunter the power of the animal. Think cheetah for speed. Eventually, humans began primarily using fiber to clothe themselves. Yet we...

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Plaids and Checks, Do you know the Difference?

Plaids and checks. These two words often show up together, but they are not actually interchangeable. They refer to do different types of patterns. Before we get into the differences between a plaid and a check, it's important to know both words traditionally describe a woven cloth.So, let's start by talking about weaving.Plaids and checks are both designs historically made as woven cloth.  And to understand woven cloth patterns, you need to know the basics about weaving. Weaving is...

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Four Common Shibori Techniques Explained

The world of textile design encompasses a variety of skills and techniques which fall into two main categories. The first describes the actual construction of a fabric out of individual fiber and threads. In other words, interlacing yarn through weaving or knitting, or interlocking just fibers through a process such as felting. Secondly, textile design also refers to designing or embellishing onto the surface of a fabric. Often referred to as surface design, this includes such techniques as printing...

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Jacobean

Jacobean Design, A Brief History from Crewel to Prints

The Jacobean Age takes its name from Jacobus, the Latin form of King James I of England. This style of 17th century decor is best known for intricate carvings, heavy oak furniture, detailed tapestries and especially crewel embroideries with flowing designs. The type of patterning associated with Jacobean Design have their roots in two places. First, the English imported Flemish tapestries in great number during the 17th century. At the same time, Indian palampores were also a very popular...

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Ikat: Definition, History & Design

Ikat fabrics are beautiful, intriguing and always in style. While other types of patterning come in and out of fashion, there is something about ikat that manages to always stay relevant. It's nothing new. This has been the case around the world and throughout history.What exactly is ikat?Ikat (pronounced: E–cot) is a method for coloring fabric in patterns by resist dyeing. The pattern is not applied to the surface of a finished fabric, nor is it woven into...

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Chevron: Definition and Design

A chevron, according to textile historian Susan Meller, "are offspring of the herringbone weave, in which columns of short diagonal stripes meeting in a line of Vs not unlike the skeletons of a fish. Some herringbone prints imitate a woven herringbone, complete with uneven lines that imply the roughness of woolly threads; others loudly declare their independence of their ancestor – for example, by setting the diagonals out of kilter, breaking up the V." These variations create something new and...

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Museum L-A is the Newest Design Pool Partner

Design Pool is excited to announce a new partnership with Museum L-A in Lewiston, Maine. Our online library now offers a selection of historical textile designs from the Museum L-A archives. These designs are available to anyone looking to license a design for a product or project. The best news? 100% of the proceeds from the use of these designs will go directly to Museum L-A to fund their cultural and educational exhibits and programs.  Ogee Flower, Pattern P1693Who...

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Textile Design, 8 Fun & Interesting Facts

Everyone at Design Pool may have different roles, but we all have one thing in common. We all have degrees in textile design. When people ask the standard cocktail party question, "What do you do?" answering, "I'm a textile designer" is nearly always a surprise, which kind of blows our minds.We surround ourselves in fabric all day, every day. Above all, fabric protects us, comforts us, and shelters us. However, most people don't consider how it's made or...

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Houndstooth, A Brief Explanation of a Classic Motif

A houndstooth refers to a design created in a woven cloth through a color and weave effect. Traditionally, the warp layout is designed with alternating bands of four dark threads followed by four white threads. Similarly, the weft is woven with four dark threads followed by four light threads. The weaving is done with a 2/2 twill weave structure. In this structure, the weft goes over two threads and then under two threads. (This is the same structure as...

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Trellis Pattern Definiton and Designs
Trellis Pattern Definiton and Designs
Trellis Pattern Definiton and Designs

Trellis Pattern Definition and Designs

There is always the desire to bring the outdoors inside to our interior spaces. The garden as a source of design inspiration offers endless forms, colors, and textures that create a feast for the eyes and senses. A trellis (treillage) is an architectural structure, usually made from an open framework or lattice of interwoven or intersecting elements that are normally made to support and display climbing foliage. They were first invented by countryside gardeners who needed a way to support growing...

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