Giving Yourself Time for Creativity

Back to Blog
Posted by: Kristin Crane Category: Design, Insight Tags: , , , , , , Comments: 0

Giving Yourself Time for Creativity

If you’re not careful, work-from-home life can easily turn into work-all-the-time life. Spending more time at home, have you found yourself working more? At Design Pool, we’re definitely guilty of it. That’s why we’ve been so inspired lately by friends giving themselves the time for creativity.

We’re particularly loving those with a daily creative practice. For many artists, that practice informs their work and brings balance to their lives. It’s easy to feel like creative time is indulgent or unproductive, but it’s quite the opposite. Whether your job is artistic in nature or not, creativity ultimately makes you better at your job.

Need some inspiration to give yourself time for creativity?

We asked a few of those friends about the art they’ve been posting and what it means to them. Be sure to give them all a follow and watch these series progress.

Paul Lewandowski • Portland, Maine

“Right before the pandemic hit I had surgery, so our stay-at-home orders coincided with my recovery. One day a package arrived with a sketchbook and pencils and I just started sketching. 130 sketches later and I haven’t stopped. My goal was to do one a day and now it’s a daily ritual. I used to work all the time. Now, I try not to work when I’m home. Instead of firing up my laptop, I pick up my sketchbook. Looking for something to sketch each day means I’m always looking in nature and that’s given my creativity a big boost.” – Paul Lewandowski

Paula Stebbins Becker • Tiverton, Rhode Island

To help stay creative while sheltering at home, I made a daily “still life” for 30 consecutive days on Instagram. Each piece consists of 3 things from my limited surrounding: a flower from nature, an object from my home, and a textile. Some days I didn’t feel genuine inspiration, but the process reminded me to find joy in the little things and to share that joy with my friends and community.”  – Paula Stebbins Becker

Rita Grendze • Batavia, Illinois

@ritagrendze

“My daily drawing practice started several years ago as a transition into studio work: a pause with a sketchbook for spontaneous mark-making before engaging in on-going, large-scale work. But this past year, between losing my mother in the fall and the stay-at-home order this spring, the drawing has become the only studio work. At some point, I must have subconsciously realized that the drawings could be enough, because they started to hold my interest longer, grew in scale, became more complex. While I am sure I will re-engage with making installations in the near future, I am curious as to where this practice will take me, how the drawings will inform my 3D work.” – Rita Grendze

Addy Bois • Providence, Rhode Island

“When I suddenly found myself at home, I became bored with the same view out my window. I missed being out in the world seeing things that make me smile. I realized I needed to change that and started taking daily walks as a way to find beauty. I feel great joy in nature and snapping a photo of what was bringing me joy on my walks has helped me capture this moment in time and a bit more beauty.”  – Addy Bois  

Many studies have been done showing the positive health benefits of creativity.

Creativity reduces anxiety, improves memory and increases your overall sense of wellbeing. Art and craft supply stores have been selling out of supplies this year as people look for ways to relax and process the world around them.

Have you been giving yourself time for creativity? We’re trying to! At Design Pool, Kristen has been exploring needle punch and the other Kristin has been weaving. Let us know what you’ve been up to in the comments or tag us on Instagram!

Share this post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Blog